Replacing the headlight bulb with an LED? - KTM Duke 390 Forum
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post #1 of 88 Old 05-21-2015, 05:19 AM Thread Starter
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Replacing the headlight bulb with an LED?

Hey guys, after doing some night riding I feel the need to make my headlight a bit brighter so I can see the road better and avoid gravel/puddles easier. HID kits are illegal in Australia so I'll go for and LED kit, something like this. Will a bulb like this fit into the existing headlamp?

If anyone has any experience with this, I'd be thrilled to have any input! I don't wanna buy something that won't fit or break my bike.
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post #2 of 88 Old 05-21-2015, 07:06 AM
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I have one of these H4 LED bulbs in the headlight of my V50 Cafe.
H4 LED Headlight Rev2 - ADVmonster

I was able to replace the stock halogen bulb with only a small modification of the rubber cap to accommodate the LED bulb's heat sink. While the V50 is not yet ready for the road, I tested the LED headlight and it appears brilliant (literally). Very white light, high beam and low, seems considerably brighter than the halogen. The V50 has a traditional round headlight shell, mounted on "ears".

I am thinking of installing one of these in my 390. The key question is whether there will be enough room behind the LED bulb to allow for the heat sink, and whether the 390's headlight module will permit enough airflow to cool the bulb effectively. Also, in a series of demo photos, the vendor lists bikes that have been tested with the bulb. Among these is the 2014 KTM SuperDuke, listed in the "potential issues" category. The bulb apparently fits fine, but the fault light flashes because the SuperDuke's ECU thinks the headlight is burned out, due to the greatly reduced resistance vis-a-vis the halogen bulb. The fix is to install a resistor to simulate the stock bulb's resistance.

ADVmonster LED Headlight! - ADVrider

I am planning to try this mod on my 390 in the not-too-distant future, but first need to finish more pressing mods and also finish work on my Cafe. If it works, it will be a win-win: Better light for less current. Like the 390, my V50 has an alternator with marginal output- 260 watts. The LED bulb uses 20 watts on low beam, 25 on high beam, saving 35 watts versus the 55/60 watt halogen bulb. This is power that can go to heated grips, heated clothing or whatever. I think LED headlights undoubtedly will become the future standard.
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Cheers, Will

"If you don't know where you're going, you might wind up somewhere else."
--Yogi Berra

2015 390 Duke
1980 Moto Guzzi V50 II (becoming a cafe racer)
1984 Moto Guzzi SP 1000
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post #3 of 88 Old 06-17-2015, 01:01 AM
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Keep us posted, Will. This was one of the first things I thought of when I powered up the bike at night. I have yet to ride at night but I still think that a crisp white LED bulb will look tons better
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post #4 of 88 Old 06-17-2015, 01:37 AM
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Originally Posted by STAF0S View Post
Keep us posted, Will. This was one of the first things I thought of when I powered up the bike at night. I have yet to ride at night but I still think that a crisp white LED bulb will look tons better
I'd keep the main bulb at 4300K just for better lighting in fog/rain. Maybe rather change the parker to a 5000K or 6000K for how it looks?


Honda CBR400RR --> Suzuki Raider 150R --> Suzuki DR200SE --> KTM D390 with sauce
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post #5 of 88 Old 06-17-2015, 03:46 AM
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true. I agree. That does look good! I would hate to sacrifice function over form
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post #6 of 88 Old 06-17-2015, 09:46 AM
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One of the latest LED headlights, the Cyclops LED, is reviewed here. The Cyclops (3600 lumens, 30 watts high beam) is a little more powerful that the Cree LED (3000 lumens, 25 watt high beam) I fitted to my V50 Cafe. However, I prefer the Cree because of its simple heat sink design as opposed to the more complicated (ie another thing to fail) cooling fan design of the Cyclops. LED headlight technology is advancing quickly.

Cyclops LED Headlight Bulbs Let You Conquer the Night - ADV Pulse

Cheers, Will

"If you don't know where you're going, you might wind up somewhere else."
--Yogi Berra

2015 390 Duke
1980 Moto Guzzi V50 II (becoming a cafe racer)
1984 Moto Guzzi SP 1000
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post #7 of 88 Old 06-17-2015, 08:03 PM
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Not sure if I've mentioned it before, but I'm likely to go for a HID conversion in future. This Philips one to be specific with a ballast from them too. This particular bulb has HID for both low and high beam by magnetically actuated moving element, they also come in 4300K.

http://www.philips.com.au/c-p/858166...conversion-kit

Honda CBR400RR --> Suzuki Raider 150R --> Suzuki DR200SE --> KTM D390 with sauce
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post #8 of 88 Old 07-27-2015, 10:57 PM
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The bad news is that installing any of the drop in LED conversion kits in a stock headlight won't give you a defined beam pattern or cutoff like a filament bulb, the technology is just too different to work properly. Headlight systems are designed around the lighting source. Changing to a different light source negates all of the photometric engineering that went into the original design.
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post #9 of 88 Old 07-27-2015, 11:09 PM
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Wouldn't a small set of add-on lights be simpler and less prone to causing fitment or electrical issues by cramming a LED into a pretty small space ? I realize a set of Denali's isn't as cheap as an LED conversion but I bet they're easier to install onto crash bars/fork tubes and less prone to causing havoc in the headlight/gauge cluster...
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post #10 of 88 Old 07-28-2015, 04:41 AM
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Bi-xenon blue placed in my Duke giving better light (correctly set) at the crossing of the + 50% ,. The big gain in engine was very fast signal having the bi-xenon
Using this is very important for my safety, because the single bright blue light stand between cars with the lights and look better in a passing or mirrors of drivers.
Looking at the Duke from the front, we observe that the brightness of the xenon is huge compared to the stocked headlight power and is not irritating to the opposite guide..

I use an Η4 bi-xenon blue..Although I would prefer the color of xenon have been closer to white, rather than to the blue (is closer to 4300-6000K and not at *8000K you maybe melt the plastic*), as most natural to the eye and more restful.

On the Duchess the white one..i still use the stocked headlight although i cant see very well its better for day time.

In general talking i want to harass people so they notice me

\xz


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