what does ABS feel like on 390? - KTM Duke 390 Forum
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post #1 of 20 Old 05-13-2016, 12:27 PM Thread Starter
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what does ABS feel like on 390?

Hi guys,

so i adjusted my back brake lever a few weeks ago and recently ran into a situation where a car in front of me stopped quite suddenly and i applied the back brake under heavy load but immediately felt what I assume is ABS kicking in, it sorta activated and deactivated quickly and could feel this on the lever. this activating/deactivating happened very quickly as i applied the brake.

do you think i should readjust my back brake to give me more braking leverage? it was somewhat alerting!
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post #2 of 20 Old 05-13-2016, 12:41 PM
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Adjusting brake levers will not affect the ABS : It kicks in when the wheels lock and the tyre slips . This can happen even with applying little forse on the brake especially in rain or on gravel roads .
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post #3 of 20 Old 05-13-2016, 01:34 PM
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The only thing you should feel is your eyeballs hitting your visor.

ABS is way more refined than it used to be, no pulsing like old systems did. What should happen is your bike come to a controlled stop without any skidding. However, any brake setup is only as good as your braking system, including the age of the fluid, the pads (condition and make) in your calipers, the condition of your disc / rotor and especially your tyres. Also, having good control from your forks, as running out of travel whilst heavy on your brakes is a little disconcerting, to say the least.

Go and find yourself a bit of private road, away from traffic, with good road surface, and ride along at say 30mph and incrementally increase your braking force time upon time, you'll be surprised at how hard you can really slam on, and it's really good practice for those odd times when it's a bloody necessity!!

Obviously, use your brains and don't be too daft, I won't cover any damage to you or your bike!
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post #4 of 20 Old 05-13-2016, 02:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HedsKatoom View Post
The only thing you should feel is your eyeballs hitting your visor.

..you'll be surprised at how hard you can really slam on, and it's really good practice for those odd times when it's a bloody necessity!!
Tell me about that .. I once owned a 1973 Triple 750 Kawasaki ... over 30 years ago . Heavy and fast machine at that time .. single disk at the front and drum at the back . ABS wasn't invented yet
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post #5 of 20 Old 05-13-2016, 03:24 PM
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Did you use only rear? if so, why?
Front is where the stopping power is unless you're in a turn or steep lean angle.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Duke123 View Post
Hi guys,

so i adjusted my back brake lever a few weeks ago and recently ran into a situation where a car in front of me stopped quite suddenly and i applied the back brake under heavy load but immediately felt what I assume is ABS kicking in, it sorta activated and deactivated quickly and could feel this on the lever. this activating/deactivating happened very quickly as i applied the brake.

do you think i should readjust my back brake to give me more braking leverage? it was somewhat alerting!
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post #6 of 20 Old 05-13-2016, 03:35 PM
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123, I was a bit concerned when I read your post about using the rear brake when you encountered an unexpected urgent need to stop - ie emergency braking. As a newbie, it is not unexpected that you would use the reflex developed in car driving and attempt to stop using the foot pedal. This is exactly what you must not do with a bike.

Because of the physics of the bike/rider package, under heavy braking a great deal of the bike/rider weight is transferred to the front wheel. At the same time, the back wheel is unloaded, sometimes even leaving the ground entirely (ie a "stoppie"). This means that the rear brake, for all intents and purposes, is essentially useless for any kind of serious braking. If hard deceleration is needed, 90-100% of this stopping power will come from the front wheel. This is why, whenever a braking situation is encountered, your first reflex must be to grab the FRONT brake lever with two or more fingers. It won't hurt if you also apply rear brake at the same time, and it may stabilize the bike somewhat, but the rear brake will have very little to contribute to the overall stopping effort.

So you must train yourself to always use the front brake in any but the most low-speed stopping situations. Do not think of your rear brake as a serious stopping device - it is a mere accessory. A motorcycle stops using the front brake. Forget the rear. This is an extremely important riding technique.

Cheers, Will

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post #7 of 20 Old 05-13-2016, 04:36 PM
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I use my front brake as my main stopping power. I do add rear brake to help slow down, but I don't mash on it by any means. If I need to stop, I want all the drag producing devices operating. I've always considered the linked brakes that some Hondas have, to be a good idea. I'm also downshifting to allow the engine to assist. I used all of this to good effect a week or so ago, when a car came into my lane coming around a curve. I would have only went into the desert at 15-20, rather than the 45-50 I was doing.

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post #8 of 20 Old 05-13-2016, 05:05 PM
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Blimey, serves me right for skim reading, as I'd completely missed the fact that the OP was only using their back brake!

For heavens sake, take note @Duke123 of what @Diploman posted above. And then go and practice what I typed above.


Edit to add: and @Trimapa - you must be like really dead old and stuff?!!
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post #9 of 20 Old 05-13-2016, 05:17 PM
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https://www.ktmduke390forum.com/forum/engine-technical-discussion/25073-what-does-abs-

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimapa View Post
Tell me about that .. I once owned a 1973 Triple 750 Kawasaki ... over 30 years ago . Heavy and fast machine at that time .. single disk at the front and drum at the back . ABS wasn't invented yet
I remember that Kawi triple. (At the time, I was pulling wrenches at a Kwack dealer. I had a deal going with the guys who bought these things:
Ya get a very special service and checkup- if Ya let me blast it on the freeway that runs through Ottawa?
Such a deal! The acceleration was awesome! (The brakes were not.) At over the 'ton'- one footpeg vibrated so bad, that you could not keep your foot on it!
Scary! Take a look at an exploded drawing of that front fork assembly, (it was primitive!)
I got friends, who bought muscle cars with ABS- years ago, And of course- they gotta demonstrate: Find an open stretch of straight highway, and just......jump on the binders! Those cars juddered so violently! I was not impressed. (And my 'boy racer' buds are all saying: " Those things are for pussies-anyway!"
Not so- this Duke ABS! Silky smooth- no shake at all! (It took slightly longer to stop- than without the ABS. (But locking up the wheels is not a good idea!
This here ABS does not let you do that! Have not tried them out on glare ice-yet. Perhaps next winter,,,,,,,,
Very important safety feature!
As I recall- the very first ABS braking systems- were developed by a U.K. firm. called Maxaret. (They used a Royal Enfield motorcycle with outriggers on it. ABS was developed for planes- not bikes.)
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post #10 of 20 Old 05-13-2016, 05:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HedsKatoom View Post


Edit to add: and @Trimapa - you must be like really dead old and stuff?!!
Really old maybe (52 ).. dead.. not yet !
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