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No, that would preclude them from collecting the premium. They inspect after the accident, impounding it if damaged so they can decide whether or not the cover was valid and if they need to pay out. There is no refund of premium if it turns out the cover was invalid.
 

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Yes l can’t take the chance on it.

If l was to have an accident and the bike was recovered, and they found the tuning/fuelling module, they could refuse to pay out.
Insurance companies will pull on any loose thread to try and avoid paying.

The bike won’t be used much anyway now until the spring, when the insurance is due anyway, so l will find someone who doesn’t mind a fuelling/tuning box on the bike.
 

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Well, l fitted the RBE to my 2019 Duke 390 and what l can say is, that

a/ the bike doesn’t feel any faster, but it won’t, RBE doesn’t claim BHP increase.

b/ it’s transformed at low RPM, will drive smoothly down to 2,000 in 1/2/3 without needing the clutch

c/ it uses a little more fuel, down from an indicated 73mpg to around 68mpg
d/ the unit is currently disconnected/module removed as my insurance didn’t want to know the bike with the unit fitted !!

e/ when my insurance is due in March l am going to find a company that will accept the bike with the module installed.
Do an idle relearn when you get a chance.
 

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It is also known as an ECU reset.
Here is how I would do it.
Remove battery cable, bleed off any residual electricity in the system by waiting a few minutes.
Reconnect the battery cable, set an accurate timer for 15 minutes and 30 seconds (15:30),start bike without any throttle input (critical) and start timer at same time. Let bike IDLE without any throttle input while keeping bike upright (sitting on seat or use track stand) for 15-16 minutes -NO MORE! Most owners choose 15:30. Turn bike off at exactly 15:30 and you have (supposedly) reset the ECU to its’ base map.

Google ‘KTM ECU reset’ and you will find other forums where this procedure is explained in detail
 

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Ah OK
There was a lot of talk about this kind of thing on the Ford forum, and the jury was out as to whether it actually did anything.

I guess it depends on the ECU but most will adjust settings continually from monitoring the engine, and don’t need to be reset under normal conditions.

It may speed up the process if something has been recently changed such as fitting a tuning box/module
 

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The reset is actually called initialization run. And if you comprehend the service manual the engine should idle AT LEAST 10 minutes (600 seconds) once the coolant temperature is greater than 77 degrees Fahrenheit.
 

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Hmmm, interesting.... I mean I've done it a bunch of times with measurable data using the Torque App and my Bluetooth adapter..... But that's just me.
 

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ECU should adjust settings continually as required (change in altitude, air temperature, etc)
No need for manual resetting.

For instance if you mess with the lambda probe, say by installing a tuning box, the CEL may come on, but if you rectify the problem the light will go out on it’s own after a couple of rides.

If you ride at high altitudes the ECU will adjust fuelling, but will adjust it back again when you come back towards lower altitude
 

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It sorta looks like you guys aren't gonna let go of torturing this subject... so I guess I'll throw in my 2 bits of torture too.


I just finished testing a spare IAT for a 2019 D390, and if you're interested, I also uploaded a picture of that plot.


Granted, I could only pull the values fast for the range between ice water and coffee, 41F to 126F; but usually, that's enough of a range for me to interpolate through programs where a curve will keep progressing or digressing to.


[Blech! Wordy.]


So, that said, I overlaid an exponential curve that approximated a 'best fit' to the data already determined in testing... and what you see in that picture is, basically, reliable beyond the actual data dots.


Obviously, the figures are nothing at all like the now moot data represented on the BoosterPlug site... because, at 68 degrees F (20 C), the OE KTM IAT resistance is only 2500 ohms. But let's assume we can believe every 20C change of air temp does lead to a 6% fuel adaptation, as the BP site represents.


For people who don't speak in C, every 10 degrees C is basically the same as 18 degrees F in change, right guys? I didn't know how else to say it, BP says every 36 degrees F leads to a 6% adaptation of open loop fueling.


Ok, so there has to be at least one person wondering why I have a spare D390 IAT. I also have a spare 000700000CM connector (actually 2) with extension leads installed. See other pic.


Those 000700000CM connectors were originally made by Sumitomo, part number 6189-0156... And if you google 'that' number, you'll soon realize it's just an old Honda VTEC connector; one that you can easily buy off of Amazon or Ebay with 12 inch long leads already installed. But why?


If you really look at the data plot I provided, you start to realize that 2 OE sensors in series, even if they were both in the same thermal location, would always drop the ECU interpretation of air temp by 28 degrees F (or 15.56 degrees C), NO MATTER WHAT THE EXTERNAL TEMP IS. Hmmm.... yes, that appears to be genuinely true.


So, if you then located the 2nd IAT in an area of even 'lower' temperature than in the airbox... right, the additional resistance attributed by the 2nd 'colder' sensor would cause an even greater ECU interpretation of air temp offset.


But the main thing I think I was headed for, originally, was that these two sensors behave in 'exactly' the same manner; so the OLoop fuel ratio offset is always the same, unlike a fixed resistor (and unlike BP)...
And the cost of the sensor and wiring is actually only 30 + 9 + 9 USD. Wow -- cute toy for the avid tinkerer, right?


Just so you don't think I'm about to brutalize my IAT harness, allow me to assure you, I'm not. I'm simply going to pull the PK-BU 'signal low/return' terminal from the OE connector; then remove one of the spare 2nd connector leads, installing that in the OE connector. Then I'll solder together two 12 inch leads from the spare connectors I bought, to create some length for the #2 sensor relocation. I'll then plug in the 2nd sensor to that new harness end, and run the signal low/return lead from that harness 'back to' and join with the OE PK-BU lead. TaDa. No cutting, just creative looping (then a little dress up).


If you look at page 4 of 9, in the 2017-2019 D390 service manual, you'll see what I mean, because the Green/White wire is the actual sensor 'high' line... And the PK-BU line serves multiple sensors, including the MAP, as a low reference line; it reenters the ECU at terminal 44 on page 5 of 9.


So anyway... I guess I'll see what happens on the CAN line IAT PID when I get it all hooked up. And If I want an on-the-fly temp comparison, I can just short together the second sensor leads with a back probe and a momentary shorting switch; that'll eliminate the additional resistance temporarily and give nothing but an airbox temp reading.


Hope this has somehow been food for thot... but my own personal sensation is now that I talk too much.:serious: Sorry bout that guys, I get kinda caught up in it sometimes.
 

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Ok so after reading everything you are posted, i'm going to try and understand what you posted. Originally there is only 1, however you added in series a second sensor that you intend on offsetting the location of it. The idea is to provide the ECU a different temperature resistance value based on one of the sensors being located in a different location so that it causes the ECU to add more fuel.

Am I understanding this correctly?
 

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Basically, you can achieve the same result as the BP... and in the same 'way' as the BP does it... by series wiring 'two' OE IAT sensors from KTM.


Said another way, 2 OE sensors in series, even at the exact same thermal location, ie the same temperature, will drop the ecu air temp signal by 28 degrees F (or by 15.6 degrees C).


What the BP proposes to do is move that 2nd sensor to a 'cooler' location, other than [ the OE location, the hot bottom of the airbox just behind and above the exhaust system ]. By moving it to a cooler location, the series resistance is even 'greater' than if they were both at the same location...


and that is precisely what you have to do with the BP sensor in order to achieve the target 20C (or 36F) IAT temp drop indicated inside the IAT CAN PID.


Does that make sense now? I'm not sure I have completely answered your question(s).
 

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For reference: the reason I produced and uploaded the IAT sensor plot was so that ppl could do the math for themselves and see that I am speaking truthfully when I say...

the combined resistance of 2 OE sensors in series produces a 28F degree IAT CAN PID offset, regardless of the current ambient temperature.

In other words, no matter what the actual temperature is outside, the effect of 2 OE sensors in series is always consistent.



So here are a couple of examples:

56 degrees equals 3400 ohms, but 6800 ohms equals 28 degrees (difference = 28 degrees).

112 degrees equals 800 ohms, but 1600 ohms equals 84 degrees (difference = 28 degrees).

140 degrees equals 400 ohms, but 800 ohms equals 112 degrees (difference = 28 degrees).




See what I mean? No vudu, just 2 negative coeffcient thermistors in series, doing their thing.
 

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Basically, you can achieve the same result as the BP... and in the same 'way' as the BP does it... by series wiring 'two' OE IAT sensors from KTM.


Said another way, 2 OE sensors in series, even at the exact same thermal location, ie the same temperature, will drop the ecu air temp signal by 28 degrees F (or by 15.6 degrees C).


What the BP proposes to do is move that 2nd sensor to a 'cooler' location, other than [ the OE location, the hot bottom of the airbox just behind and above the exhaust system ]. By moving it to a cooler location, the series resistance is even 'greater' than if they were both at the same location...


and that is precisely what you have to do with the BP sensor in order to achieve the target 20C (or 36F) IAT temp drop indicated inside the IAT CAN PID.


Does that make sense now? I'm not sure I have completely answered your question(s).
You did, that is pretty much exactly what I figured you were trying to say. It's def a cheap way to do it! I wish the oem injector was a little bit larger, I have PCV and I have pretty much maxed it out. Does anyone know the correct injector needed that it just a bit larger?
 
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