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Discussion Starter #1
I'm thinking about replacing stock cartridges in a 2019 Duke 390 with Andreani inserts.

Duke service manual describes for leg disassembly as fairly simple:
1. Unscrew the top cap
2. Drain the oil
3. Remove the bottom screw under the fork leg
4. Slide the entire cartridge out

The installation manual for the 105/kt7e describes more steps
1. Unscrew the top cap
2. Split the internals to remove the spring (this requires a special tool and, from what I've read, heating up some red loctite)
3. Remove the top part of the internals and the spring
4. Drain the oil
5. Remove the bottom screw under the fork leg
6. Slide the bottom part of the internals out

Both instructions describe installation as more or less the reverse of disassembly.

Why would I need to separate the fork internals and install them in steps? It looks like the Andreani inserts come as a pre-assembled cartridge unit, with the spring installed, and the post-2017 Dukes have cartridges that should come out as a unit as well..

Or are these Andreani instructions for older models (pre-2017), with damper rod stock internals? I've checked the manual for 105/kt2e (for the older Duke 390) and it has the same steps and pictures.
 

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Not sure if you have seen this vdo.
It is the Andreani one and should be the most correct one.
There are different vdo's on the Internet.
I have had it done by the Andreani distributor in Chiang Mai (Sina Moto), I was not present so no experience in the process.
I went back at a later stage to have the springs changed out for weaker ones as the stiff ones that the kit is supplied with was too stiff for me, even et the full unscrewed pre-load it would not reach the sag I needed.
Now it does.
My Duke b.t.w. is the first Gen.

 

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Discussion Starter #3
This video doesn't show the installation process, it would be different depending on the bike.
 

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Sorry, you are correct.
Have a look through this thread from the RC forum if you have not already:

This video doesn't show the installation process, it would be different depending on the bike.
 

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Is there anyone with this kit already installed? I'm interested to know if there is space to access the adjustments at the top of the fork caps without the need to remove the handlebar.
 

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There is plenty of space on my first Gen Duke 390.

Is there anyone with this kit already installed? I'm interested to know if there is space to access the adjustments at the top of the fork caps without the need to remove the handlebar.
 

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I know what you mean. I have been researching Ohlins cartridges/springs. I noticed that the caps reside directly under the handlebars. I think that a modified hex key wrench would do the trick for adjusting the comp/rebound screws if an uncut one wouldn’t fit.


Is there anyone with this kit already installed? I'm interested to know if there is space to access the adjustments at the top of the fork caps without the need to remove the handlebar.
 

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I know what you mean. I have been researching Ohlins cartridges/springs. I noticed that the caps reside directly under the handlebars. I think that a modified hex key wrench would do the trick for adjusting the comp/rebound screws if an uncut one wouldn’t fit.
Yes, the Ohlins fork kit is very low profile and there is still not a lot of room for adjusting the dials. I considered the Andreani before seeing the Ohlins in person but they seem to have a higher profile on the top cap adjusters.
 

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Were you able to ride either bike, with Ohlins or Andreani?
 

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Hey Whyzee, I rode a 2017 with Öhlins fork inserts (not sure the kit number). The springs were stiffer and this helped settle the bike under hard braking and through rough coners at lean. The bike also had an Öhlins KT301 rear. I’m actually trying to find out more info on the spring that was fitted to the rear shock. The part number on the spring is 60013-34. I’ll probably have to start a new thread for the rear.
 

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Well I can help you with the item numbers needed for a 2019 as they are a bit different, according to Gary at Ohlins USA.
Front end would be FKS 507 (NIX 30mm cartridge) and no springs are supplied. The spring series required Is 08423-xx, with xx being replaced by your desired spring rate.
Rear end for the Duke is KT801 (STx46 series) and the supplied spring is 61092-41 which is 170mm long and 115 N/mm rate. Gary didn’t/couldn’t come up with any other rates in this spring family for the rear shock, so.....
 

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Thanks Whyzee, i heard a modification may be required to install the fork tubes? Or could I diy install them?
 

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Thanks Whyzee, i heard a modification may be required to install the fork tubes? Or could I diy install them?
What modification?
when I buy them, I will be doing them myself as I do not let others touch my vehicles
 

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I was thinking DIY also but I’m not sure exactly what the mod is. Just heard it in a quote from the Dealership who had already completed the installation before. I’m sure with a little mechanical skill, it would be possible to figure out during assembly
 

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I’ve studied all of the installation guides for these exact parts as well as about every YouTube video of Ohlins cartridges (not specific to our bike) and videos that are specific to our bike but are not Ohlins cartridges and it does not look out of my scope of ability. Might need one special tool for sure, for the top cap. Or at minimum a pin wrench from Any other supplier.
 

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According to my research, Its a possibility that since the forks are made to fit the RC390 also, which have a shorter fork travel, there might need to be a spacer or shim fabricated for the adaptation
 

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Discussion Starter #17
So I just swapped the cartridges and have the following notes for future DIYers.

This applies to 2017+ Duke 390. The instructions are different for older Dukes, not sure about RCs.

Disassembly of the stock fork is done as per the KTM Repair Manual and is easy as pie. There's no loctite (older models apparently had a bunch of it!). You'll need a 24mm wrench or socket to unscrew the top cap and a H7 hex to unscrew the bottom bolt. Apparently the H7 is not a common size, had to drive to the hardware store to get it. Also, grab a table vice, the job is much easier with one.

Once the top cap is off, drain the oil. Then remove the bottom bolt, slide out the whole cartridge and drain the rest. No need to split the stock cartridge and extract the spring as the manual suggests, the Andreani cartridges come with their own springs.

Now to install the new cartridges, you will actually need to split them, ie. unscrew the top cap, because you'll need to measure the fork oil level with the springs out. This doesn't require special tools, the top unscrews by hand, to screw it back on you'll need two 17mm wrenches and preferably someone to hold the spring compressed (tho I managed without help with some ingenuity). The spring isn't so stiff as to require a compressor, your arms will do (this may vary depending on spring rate, I'm lightweight).

The installation instructions supplied with the kit are ok. For the disassembly of the stock fork follow the KTM manual, not Andreani.

The oil level is specified on the box, not in the manual. Make sure you don't toss the cardboard before you're done wrenching.

I noticed that the Andreani cartridge is a bit longer than stock. When I reinstalled the reassembled legs into the triple clamps, I couldn't attach the brake caliper because the brake line wasn't long enough. I slid the legs upwards in the triple clamps by a good 15mm in order to get the fork bottoms in position for the brake caliper. This seems odd. Will the springs settle and compress a bit? Did I mess something up? Or should I extend the brake line somehow and allow for the increased front ride height?

Now, with the legs higher in the triple clamps, the adjusters are very near the handlebars. I can't adjust them without removing the handlebars or fabricating a very low-profile hex key.
 

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