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How difficult was the install? How big of difference does it make with the handling? Is it worth it?
 

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I assume you mean the KTM Powerparts lowering kit?
It lowers the bike about 3cm and makes no difference to the handling at all, as the front and rear are lowered the same amount.

I test rode a 2018 Duke with one fitted and it made quite a difference to how far l could get my feet down.

I bought the kit and it doesn’t look that difficult to fit, although you’d need to lift the bike under the engine in order to get the shock out.

In the end l never fitted the kit though. I was just back into biking and lacked confidence, however after 800 miles on the bike l’m happy to just put one foot down when l stop.

The kit is for sale if you decide you want one, but it’s for the 2017 onward bike.
 

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Looks like you have the 2015 Duke, this kit won’t be any use to you.

One good thing, the kit for pre-2007 is a fair bit cheaper
 

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29" inseam here (I'm on a 2018).

I considered the kit, but I decided to just lower the shock preload first. That got me enough to make a big difference. I haven't lowered the front at all, but could certainly do so to match the rear. I'd say I got 1/2" to 3/4" from the preload adjustment. If I did the front to match, I'd have to do something about the side stand, because it would be too long. Just lowering the rear "should" have an impact on handling: slowing the steering a bit - but there was nothing noticeable.


I've ridden for years and always on "conventional" or "sport" style bikes, so seats are always high for me. I'm old, so just swinging my leg over that high seat is a bit of a pain, but actually riding it's fine. The light weight also makes it very easy to deal with. So, I'd try dropping the preload a bit and see if it helps before I'd go for the kit.
 

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I have run the T-Rex lowering link for the rear, 45mm drop and I have RC390 internals in the forks. So forks are 125mm instead of 150mm travel, plus slid the tubes up by about 13mm (maximum possible on smooth section of fork), effectively 38mm lowered.

I touched the engine case down at a local track day which caused me to fall. I could have been further off the bike and avoided touching the engine down but I'm still learning optimum body position etc. I didn't think bike would touch down but it did and so I have since raised the bike back to stock height in rear, with front still at 25mm drop but fork tubes level with clamps again.

So, it will come down to your needs. For me, the lowering was for my wife, who hasn't actually ridden the bike still. I will reinstall the rear link if/when she wants to ride it as it does make a difference when stopped at a light -> more confidence with feet flatter on ground. But otherwise, if you don't need that, I would suggest it's worth it.
 

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The best way to lower the bike, if you want to, is to use the proper KTM kit.
As it lowers the front and rear by the same amount by the fitting of new (shock/fork springs) so maintaining the geometry of the bike
It also comes with a shorter side stand. If you want to lower it, don’t start dropping the forks in the yokes and winding off the preload, fit the proper kit.
 

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The best way to lower the bike, if you want to, is to use the proper KTM kit.
As it lowers the front and rear by the same amount by the fitting of n
ew (shock/fork springs) so maintaining the geometry of the bike
It also comes with a shorter side stand. If you want to lower it, don’t start dropping the forks in the yokes and winding off the preload, fit the proper kit.
Why?

Dropping (actually "raising") the forks and winding off preload will result in identical results as far as geometry, so why not? Especially as this will allow one to experiment with a lowered bike and see if that's what one really wants.
 

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Well, you can’t raise the forks enough to maintain correct geometry after lowering the rear, so it will affect the handling.

And reducing the shock preload won’t give the same result as fitting a shorter spring.
 

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Never use the preload to lower the bike. The correct setting will keep around 25 - 33% to extension and the rest to compression.
If you use the preload to lower in an specific situation the shock will reach the bottom of it.
Luis
 

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Honest question: What are some scenarios in which one WOULD adjust the back shock? I mean it IS adjustable and even comes with the tool to do it. Im just trying to understand. Could it need to be adjusted for rider weight?
 

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KTM has specific parts to lower the bike. If someone thinks that he knows a better way... Well he is wrong...
 

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Generally you need to set it so that when sat on the bike the shock compresses about 1/3 of its travel.

Alternatively, as the rear wheel travel is 150mm
You could set it so the rear wheel moves 50mm
You’d have to include the static sag (the amount it moves without anybody sat on the bike)
So if that’s 20mm you need to adjust for a further 30mm when you sit on the saddle.
 

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Well you need to adjust it as above for the correct setting.
It will likely need winding up from the factory setting, as it’s about right for me and l weigh 140lbs
 

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Generally you need to set it so that when sat on the bike the shock compresses about 1/3 of its travel.

Alternatively, as the rear wheel travel is 150mm
You could set it so the rear wheel moves 50mm
You’d have to include the static sag (the amount it moves without anybody sat on the bike)
So if that’s 20mm you need to adjust for a further 30mm when you sit on the saddle.
Thank you. Now I just need someone competent to help me look at this. LOL
 

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Not difficult but
It needs the help of a friend

Get a friend to lift the rear of the bike until the shock reaches the top of its travel.

Measure the distance from the rear wheel spindle straight up to a part of the bodywork.

Allow the bike to rest back on the suspension.

Sit on the bike.

Use the preload spanner from the bike tool kit to adjust the shock until the measurement from the rear wheel spindle to the same piece of bodywork is 5cm less than it was with your friend holding the back of the bike up.

Adjust one click at a time, get off the bike and make the adjustment then get back on and measure again.

My guess
2 clicks up from factory setting.
 
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