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I can only get one foot down at a time. At first l wanted to lower the bike but it’s such a light weight machine that l soon found that one foot down was OK.
 

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I’ve had several bikes that I could only get one foot down. I didn’t consider lowering any of them. You just have to be careful not to put your foot down on the side the ground is lower. That never ends well
 

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Wise words, though I’m not sure how much there is to shave. It’s the side/ corner that typically needs shaving most to allow your legs to come in closer not the top that most assume.
The dealer I bought my bike from which I asked about the lowering kit did not recommend it, they were hesitant infact when I inquired about it asking me if I really thought I needed it. The dealership if you want to even call it that sells KTM only, they really are a performance motocross tuning/repair shop first and then a bike seller second. I trust their opinion 100% and they have a huge reputation before them.

I would really try to hug the seat tank and sit far forward, or just adjust at stops to lean one foot down so you can flat foot.
 

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I suspect the reason they didn't recommend lowering the bike is because you'd get lower ground clearance. In on-road situations, this mostly translates to scraping foot pegs at lower lean angles than on a normal-height bike.

Now, a stock 2017+ Duke has plenty of ground clearance for turning (more than the previous model). You can get a knee down with still room to spare under the peg, it's better than most non-sportbikes out there.

My opinion is, if a person is just starting out on a bike, they're not gonna lean over enough to scrape pegs even on a lowered bike. It doesn't make a difference. The increased confidence of being able to flat-foot it *does* make a difference. Once the person gains some skill and confidence, the lowering kit can be removed to open up lean angles, just keep the old parts.
 

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I think the reason they didn’t recommend is because it was a motocross shop and the Duke by comparison is already slammed.
 

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Well yeah, for off-road applications there are legit reasons to keep the bike high, but I assumed the shop knows Dukes are not off-road bikes :)
 

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They might know that at an intellectual level, but it’s not what they do every day. Why would they support lowering a bike that is already lower than would be acceptable to what they sell every day to their normal customer base. It’s like a competition power boat shop selling a rowing boat - are they going to recommend oars or an outboard?
 

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Well IMO a lowering kit will do at the following circumstances:

1. You are very-very short rider.
2. You need to be 0.5 second faster on the track.
3. You like having a "racing" look.

For those 3 cases there is an easy solution;

1. Buy shorter bike
2. Are you a professional race rider?
3. Buy RC390 or a kawa ninja 400



Sent from my ASUS_X00HD using Tapatalk
 

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How would lowering improve track times or give a racing look? Race bikes tend to be surprisingly tall, they need the ground clearance at high lean.
 

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Well, l have the official 2017 onwards lowering kit for sale if anybody needs one, at a good saving over what you’d pay from a dealer.
 

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I guess not then!
Still surprised at the lack of interest, after all the talk about lowering the bike.
Hi! Just came across this post, and know it is rather dated, but wondered if you still have the lowering kit available as I have a 28" inseam, and trying to determine if I would even be able to touch the ground with one foot on a Duke?
 

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Hi there actually l do still have the kit, l never got around to selling it.
The problem is, cost of postage to the US from the U.K. might be prohibitive as it's a fairly large box.
The kit contains a new rear spring, a new
side stand, and new springs for the forks plus various bits and pieces.
 

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Hi there actually l do still have the kit, l never got around to selling it.
The problem is, cost of postage to the US from the U.K. might be prohibitive as it's a fairly large box.
The kit contains a new rear spring, a new
side stand, and new springs for the forks plus various bits and pieces.
Thank you! I didn't realize you were in the UK. I'm looking at the 2021 Duke 390, but with a 28"(710mm) inseam, I don't think the listed 32.3" (820mm) seat height would be very comfortable or practical around town. I've been riding since age 12, so accustomed to dealing with seat height issues, but when I rode dirt bikes as a kid it wasn't an issue because I didn't have to deal with stop and go traffic. As an adult, I rode cruiser type bikes for years, and scraped a lot of foot pegs because the dual sports and sport bikes kept getting taller and taller. My aggressive riding is far behind me, I hope, so not concerned with steep lean angles. What attracted me to the Duke is its low end torque and lightweight. According to the spec sheet, it only weighs 328.5# (149 kilos). The only other viable alternatives are the Yamaha MT-03, or the Kawasaki Z400, but both of them rely on high RPMs to produce their power. Thank you again for responding, and stay safe!
 

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My inseam is 29" and initially l didn't feel confident on the Duke as l had just come back to biking after a gap of 12 years.

I bought the lowering kit with the intention of fitting it, but having ridden the Duke 1,000 miles or so l gained confidence.

l can get both toes down but when l stop l just put one foot down.

The bike is so light (compared to my previous bikes) that it gives you confidence that it won't fall over.

As your inseam is 28" you'd have to see how it went and then decide whether you need the lowering kit.
lt lowers the bike by about 1"
 

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My inseam is 29" and initially l didn't feel confident on the Duke as l had just come back to biking after a gap of 12 years.

I bought the lowering kit with the intention of fitting it, but having ridden the Duke 1,000 miles or so l gained confidence.

l can get both toes down but when l stop l just put one foot down.

The bike is so light (compared to my previous bikes) that it gives you confidence that it won't fall over.

As your inseam is 28" you'd have to see how it went and then decide whether you need the lowering kit.
lt lowers the bike by about 1"
Thank you Lightening! When I measured my inseam, I measured from my crotch to the floor barefoot at 28" (711mm), so not sure if that's what "inseam" means. I didn't go by my pants size because that tends to vary. Is that how you measured your 29" inseam? I see people list height when inquiring about fit, but inseam length is what matters when it comes to seat height.

I'm also very light, at about 125-130# (57-58kg) with gear on, and wonder how much of a sag measurement I could expect with the preload dialed out? If the static seat height is 32.3" (820mm) as I've read, I assume that rider sag may put me at about 31.3" (795mm)?

Why the F didn't they make us use the metric system here in the US? It is so superior for measuring, but is like a foreign language to me. lol

I have convinced myself that I want a Duke 390, but have not even sat on one yet, so trying to be realistic. With my height, I am very experienced at dealing with the discomfort and inconvenience of stretching to reach the ground, especially when that ground may not be level or solid.

I am not concerned with the expense or work involved in making the bike fit me, but also know better than to mess with something that much smarter engineers have produced through testing and various iterations.

I'll only be using the bike around town or for scenic drives in the country, but will need to be able to do some stretches of expressway occasionally. I haven't scraped foot pegs in years, and not intending to go back to that type of riding - too many deer in my area, and I remember far too well what it felt like to go into a slide at 70mph as one bounced off my front tire!

Years ago, I tore a 750 Intruder down to the frame, ripped out the airbox, spent hours and hours and hours and... getting the jetting correct, cut the frame and welded in lower supports, and installed a stepped seat like was popular on the 70's choppers to get even lower on the bike. Maneuvering a static bike when your legs are bent is much easier than when on tiptoes. What I learned from that experience is that you can achieve anything with enough effort, and with experimentation you can make a bike faster, but it's very easy to F it up too!
 
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