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Installed my powertronic today, the bike is much smoother at low rpm
The PowerTRONIC would eliminate (or reduce to a considerable extent) the jerkiness that several 390 owners face due to it's ignition and fuel control algorithms aside from the maps that we provide. With hours of research put in on the dyno and on road, we have optimised our algorithms and identified that even on similar maps the PowerTRONIC would perform par excellence.
 

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Just to add to this in case anybody finds the thread on a google search.
I had this issue on my 2019 Duke 390 and pretty much eliminated it by fitting a “Rapid Bike Easy” unit.
I am sure there are other similar devices available but this was the cheapest and came up on a search for this bike.

There is a better version called the “Evo” but if you just want to cure the low speed “jerking” then the “Easy” unit does that.

Totally transformed the bike in traffic/city riding.
 

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People, no amount of re-mapping is going to change the inherent character of these engines. they are HIGH PERFORMANCE singles. They rev to 10k rpm. The old british singles were not high performance and they had heavy flywheels to smooth them out, these motors are completely different. Trying to run them at 3000 rpm is a complete waste of time and lugging them at that speed can be damaging.

The only reason I can think of why people would want to do this is to get better fuel economy but that is not the way to do it. The best fuel economy is gained by running small throttle openings much closer to the torque peak of 7000 rpm.

Multi-cylinder engines will run smoothly at low rpm, a single will not.
 

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Sorry but l have to disagree in part, primarily because my Duke 390 now runs fine at low RPM after fitting the box mentioned above.
Sure it’s not going to pull away from 1,000 rpm like my Z1000 did, but there’s no reason to have to slip the clutch in traffic at under 4,000 rpm.

I can accept that these bikes run rough at low RPM due to emissions limitations but it can be cured, without removing the CAT or modifying anything else on the bike.

Fuel consumption has remained about the same, its only a minor fuelling tweak at certain RPM.
 

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I do where possible

As stated above, it’s not a low revving engine. But in slow traffic it’s not always so easy when you are doing only very low speed.

Mine will now drive at 5mph in first gear without having to use the clutch.
It’s sometimes useful.
 

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The powertonic only changes closed loop. Open loop is controlled by afr reading from lambda sensor. That is where problem is. They made the bike lean to meet imission standards. Get a box that changes signal from lamba scensor or make your own if you have a way to measure the afr. Its basically just a resistor.
 

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Did you tell your insurance you fitted it? My insurance would only list it as a "power commander" despite the fact that it doesn't increase the power of the engine at all, it only makes it smoother at low RPM

They basically wanted to increase the premium from £110 to £250

So l had to disconnect it and am back to slipping the clutch at low RPM.

Can someone recommend me an insurance company that knows the difference between a Power Commander and a Rapid Bike Easy !!

With cars there's companies who specialise in modified vehicles, the insurer for my modified Clio 182 didn't load the premium for the remap, Janspeed exhaust, lowered suspension, airbox, etc
As they knew what these things were.
 

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Use mcn comparison site for quotes. Specialist motorbike insurers that i can think of off the top of my head are: be moto, Bennett’s, Carole Nash
 

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Looking at his reply above I don't think he even understands the problem.
My bike is much better with the rapid bike easy fitted 👍recommended
Yes, I was wrong. Sorry. Modifying the output of the lambda sensor in closed loop conditions will affect the fueling. I was answering a question that wasn't asked.

It comes from seeing so many posts about poor throttle response at low revs. And these are usually in open loop conditions. I have an 1100 V4 Aprilia as well as a 390 Duke. Both suffer from excessive torque demand at low revs. The Ape will sound like a bag of bolts if you give it too much twist grip below 4k revs. The Duke has similar characteristics which are totally unconnected to closed loop conditions.
 

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Yes, I was wrong. Sorry. Modifying the output of the lambda sensor in closed loop conditions will affect the fueling. I was answering a question that wasn't asked.

It comes from seeing so many posts about poor throttle response at low revs. And these are usually in open loop conditions. I have an 1100 V4 Aprilia as well as a 390 Duke. Both suffer from excessive torque demand at low revs. The Ape will sound like a bag of bolts if you give it too much twist grip below 4k revs. The Duke has similar characteristics which are totally unconnected to closed loop conditions.
Lamda does not change closed Loop, only open loop.
You can richen closed loop with piggyback which will help with jerking if you modulate throttle. It will stay in closed loop as long as rpm or throttle is moving ( moving between cells in closed loop map). As soon as you have a steady throttle and stable rpm it will flip into open loop and start using lambda sensor to change fueling. My bike will not jerk with steady throttle 3000 up with modified sensor output.
 

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Lamda does not change closed Loop, only open loop.
You can richen closed loop with piggyback which will help with jerking if you modulate throttle. It will stay in closed loop as long as rpm or throttle is moving ( moving between cells in closed loop map). As soon as you have a steady throttle and stable rpm it will flip into open loop and start using lambda sensor to change fueling. My bike will not jerk with steady throttle 3000 up with modified sensor output.
You have mixed up closed and open loop.
 

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A booster plug will help smooth out low speed idle, but it will never completely disappear. It's a characteristic of the engine. Just use your clutch to modulate the power delivery (look up 'feathering' the clutch).
 
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