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I'm not too scared of many mechanical procedures... except doing the vale clearances on my Duke. Maybe this will help me get over my phobia :)
 

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Luc, It will be a great service to all our members if you can do a detailed photo documentary on checking/shimming 390 valves. We have confidence in your engineering credentials. Many thanks.


You did read this, n'est-ce pas?

2015 KTM RC390 FIRST SERVICE | MOTORCYCLIST
 

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valve clearence is an easy job if you do exactly as the repair manual says. Duke 125/200/390 engine has shims, and the clearence sould be adjusted by using different shim number.The valve clearence in this engines tend to become smaller (in duke200) so this means clearence check can't wait for the "ticking" sound to appear and it has to be done at the service schedule(at first 1000km and then every 15.000 km). A 0.1 mm at the inlet and 0.12 at the exhaust is the minimum acceptable clearence for safe 15000 km operation.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yep I did! It actually gave me the kick in the butt to go ahead.

I will keep taking pictures and writing short comments as I go along. Might not go in the shed tonight, it's 0 celsius here today...

Thanks all!
 

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Yep I did! It actually gave me the kick in the butt to go ahead.

I will keep taking pictures and writing short comments as I go along. Might not go in the shed tonight, it's 0 celsius here today...

Thanks all!
Good for you. For me the worst thing was to take out the tank! Very messy!
 

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valve clearence is an easy job if you do exactly as the repair manual says.
If you do it exactly like the manual, then that is with the motor out of the frame sitting on a bench.

Got to agree with you there, doing the job on a bench would be relatively easy.

Unfortunately as most of us have the engine installed in our motorcycles, we believe the job will not be all that easy due to general access, a much mentioned issue with this motorcycle and certainly one I worry about with my large 'shovel' shaped hands.
 

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for the valve clearence you don't have to remove the engine, just the fuel tank.

i agree for the general acces. All parts tight up so close in this bike!

I have 2 general rules that help me a lot.
1.Never apply violence. If something is hard to be stripped, take a brake, think it again, look again the service manual and then try it again.
2.Never hurry up when it comes to rebuild.

Patience is the most essential virtue when you have to deal with so tight up bikes such the 390.
 

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If you do it exactly like the manual, then that is with the motor out of the frame sitting on a bench.

Got to agree with you there, doing the job on a bench would be relatively easy.

Unfortunately as most of us have the engine installed in our motorcycles, we believe the job will not be all that easy due to general access, a much mentioned issue with this motorcycle and certainly one I worry about with my large 'shovel' shaped hands.
640 speaks the truth. Both 390 variants have to rank highly among the all-time most difficult bikes to work on, particularly in the cylinder head area. This is not surprising, given the clever but extremely dense packaging that enabled KTM to stuff - literally - a 400cc-class motor into a diminutive frame originally designed to accommodate a 125cc. Checking/shimming the valves per se does not appear to be an especially demanding operation: But doing this while the engine is still in the frame seems to many of us extremely challenging, simply because of the problematic access. When professionals such as Ari Henning comment on the constrained access that complicates working on 390 valves, and experienced dealer service shops spend extravagant hours performing this service, that alerts DIY'ers that an obstacle path awaits the intrepid home mechanic who decides to wrestle with the valves. Luc is attempting to de-mystify this operation and show that it is possible for mere mortals to complete this operation successfully without dire consequences. Bonne chance, Luc! We hope your photo documentary will become a classic "How To", like Hoover's SPAL install.
 
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.. We hope your photo documentary will become a classic "How To", like Hoover's SPAL install.
I'm confident that Marc will produce an excellent tutorial on how to check valve clearance .. no matter how good the tutorial will turn out to be ; Installing the SPAL fan will still be a walk in the park compared to the valve check on this bike !
 

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I had to pull the tank to install the Bazzaz, and my advice is to find a good tight fitting plug for the gas tank filler. There is a tab in there that gets in the way, and the plastic bag trick looks dodgy to me. An exhaust plug (for washing bikes with upswept pipes) might work.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I had to pull the tank to install the Bazzaz, and my advice is to find a good tight fitting plug for the gas tank filler. There is a tab in there that gets in the way, and the plastic bag trick looks dodgy to me. An exhaust plug (for washing bikes with upswept pipes) might work.
For plugging the tank I'm not too worried. You're not trying to prevent it from spilling, just to keep evaporation down...

What I actually did was stuff a rag in the plastic bag, and shove that down the hole. The bag just helps to prevent the rag from soaking up gasoline.

Very simple and "crude" way of doing it, but I used what I had laying around.
 

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For plugging the tank I'm not too worried. You're not trying to prevent it from spilling, just to keep evaporation down...

What I actually did was stuff a rag in the plastic bag, and shove that down the hole. The bag just helps to prevent the rag from soaking up gasoline.

Very simple and "crude" way of doing it, but I used what I had laying around.
It would happen that I used the exact same high tech materials to plug the tank when I took it of to fit the Rapid Bike ECU :) Worked fine for me
 

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For plugging the tank I'm not too worried. You're not trying to prevent it from spilling, just to keep evaporation down...

What I actually did was stuff a rag in the plastic bag, and shove that down the hole. The bag just helps to prevent the rag from soaking up gasoline.

Very simple and "crude" way of doing it, but I used what I had laying around.
I must be clumsier than most, or maybe I needed a helper but the tank sloshed plenty as I was trying to remove the fuel lines etc. and the plug I used leaked.

With a gas fired water heater in the same garage, I don't want to take any chances. 40+ years ago I burnt a garage down because of a fuel spill! Hard to forget something like that.
 
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