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I must be clumsier than most, or maybe I needed a helper but the tank sloshed plenty as I was trying to remove the fuel lines etc. and the plug I used leaked.

With a gas fired water heater in the same garage, I don't want to take any chances. 40+ years ago I burnt a garage down because of a fuel spill! Hard to forget something like that.
I doubt very much that you are clumsier than any of us : To be honest , when I took of the tank it was to fit the piggyback ECU . I anticipated that operation and rode the bike on nearly empty before that . Taking of the fuel line from the pump does produce for an instant a spray (pressurized ) of fuel . I rested my tank on a garden variety plastic bucket with the pump attached and the infamous rag in plastic bag . Fuel smell , yes but no fuel spilling / leaking as such .
So , like you say having a gas fired heating on and considering what you went through 40+ years ago I can understand your concern .
 

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When I uninstalled the fuel tank, I used this handy clamp to shut off the fuel line. Found it at Harbor Freight for very cheap as part of a set of 4, all sized for different diameter fuel/fluid lines. Worked perfectly - not a drop of fuel spilled. I have a Chinese fuel cap, which I screwed back onto the fuel tank after the shroud was removed and it sealed the tank quite adequately.
 
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But , that is you Will , as always a diplomatic and reflected approach: we just shoot first and then start asking ourselves questions ...
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Hello!!

I've been at work a bit more! There are quite a few new pics on the link I posted and the top of the thread. I do in fact need to correct the exhaust valve clearances... So this morning that's what I'm doing, actually just changing the shims.

As for the gas tank, fuel caping, safety management, I would always recommend that you take care of what you are doing and ensure you are doing it in a safe way. If you don't feel comfortable doing this, ask for help, get proper tools, etc. In my case, I was at ease with this procedure in "my" conditions (exterior shed with plenty of ventilation, wooden blocks to rest the tank on, proper clamping of fuel hose, crude tank plug that fits nicely from my point of view. Your results may vary)

I'm actually enjoying documenting all of this procedure. I'm trying to take as many "helpful" pics as possible. Being passed the halfway point at the moment, I can safely say that anybody that isn't afraid of doing a brake job on their car, shouldn't be afraid of doing this procedure.

To be continued... Out to the shed in 5 celsius weather...
 

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Luc, Your work is fabulous, both on the actual valve job and the documentation. Exceptional. Outstanding. This will be extraordinarily helpful to DIY'ers, and I think many will now be encouraged to take on this non-trivial job themselves, thanks to you. Mille fois MERCI!!

Luc, You DA MAN! You and Kinky. Canadians taking over.....
 

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Luc , impressive piece of tutorial you have presented us so far . Doubt that I will ever amass enough courage to go that far on my engine .
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Hello again everyone!!

I AM DONE!!!! Job completed!

Just check out the link again.

Spoiler alert : I now have a charming valve clicking sound, but I love the SPAL fan! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Luc, Your work is fabulous, both on the actual valve job and the documentation. Exceptional. Outstanding. This will be extraordinarily helpful to DIY'ers, and I think many will now be encouraged to take on this non-trivial job themselves, thanks to you. Mille fois MERCI!!

Luc, You DA MAN! You and Kinky. Canadians taking over.....
Thanks a bunch!
 

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http://www.ktmduke390forum.com/forum/engine-technical-discussion/23490-my-valve-clear

Outstanding and very helpful tutorial, Luc! (I was gonna do this while my bike is parked in my living room- but I now see that is not a cool idea.) Thinking that I should install a SPAL fan while doing this, but I don't have the fan yet- wait till I can park it outside.
Very well done! (Dukesters should erect a statue in yer honor!)
 

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Outstanding and very helpful tutorial, Luc! (I was gonna do this while my bike is parked in my living room- but I now see that is not a cool idea.) Thinking that I should install a SPAL fan while doing this, but I don't have the fan yet- wait till I can park it outside.
Very well done! (Dukesters should erect a statue in yer honor!)
Bike in living room , I know the feeling .. and a wife that wasn't impressed having a 1992 Fat Boy in the kitchen for over 3 months during a harsh winter in France . I had removed the all the fuel .. but somehow not the fumes ... let alone the oil smell . I can assure you she wan't impressed with what she called the largest , smelliest and unless " kitchen aid " ever ! :( . The Duke is in the garage, but now each time she goes past it she checks what I have added to my " Lego " bike . Yes , that is what she calls my little Duke .. she must be jealous :)
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Thanks all for your kind words. I really did have a lot of fun doing this and documenting, all the time thinking it could be useful to others. Nice to see it will be appreciated.

After doing this, major top end work seems achievable : head gasket, lapping valves, etc. The hardest part is, after all, getting to the top end.

As for doing this in your living room... If you live alone, I would say it's not a problem, just protect your floor, cause you'Re going to get some oil on the floor for sure. If you have a partner.... iiiiiishhhhh, don't think it would fly ;-). I did mine in a very minimalist shed outside, on a rear paddock stand.
 

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Nicely done. I would give it a go, but would have to do it with the assistance of an experienced mechanic. I learn better that way, and I would have someone to bail me out if I messed something up. :eek:
 

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Luc, Thanks for the great write-up. If only adjusting exhaust valves could you have left the intake cam in place ? Also my bike has the clickity-clack noise after adjusting exhaust valves. Reminds me of a loud sewing machine.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Luc, Thanks for the great write-up. If only adjusting exhaust valves could you have left the intake cam in place ? Also my bike has the clickity-clack noise after adjusting exhaust valves. Reminds me of a loud sewing machine.
Yep! The good old sewing machine!

Indeed , if only doing exhaust I could have removed only that camshaft. But for better pictures I removed them both, and in reality, it only takes seconds to remove or put them back in. And regardless of how many you take out, you still need to fiddle with aligning the chain and sprocket teeth.
 

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Luc,

Good work and excellent tutorial. I dont have the courage to open up the bike and do that level of mechanics. I brought mine to Duroy at the end of summer, and they said it was all good. Now Im paranoid that their mechanic didn't do anything, given the clearance values on your exhaust valves. Do you think that's possible?

Gabe
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Luc,

Good work and excellent tutorial. I dont have the courage to open up the bike and do that level of mechanics. I brought mine to Duroy at the end of summer, and they said it was all good. Now Im paranoid that their mechanic didn't do anything, given the clearance values on your exhaust valves. Do you think that's possible?

Gabe
Well... I hate to talk badly about anybody, but I have to say I really wasn't impressed with Duroy on the mechanics side, especially considering they are the buggest KTM dealer in Quebec. On the day of my 1st service, the "only" mechanic was out for the day, and it's the dispatcher that actually did my service and oil change.

It was nothing more than an oil change and looking around the bike, while pointing his finger at stuff ad wiggling some more stuff... When I asked about the valve clearance, the answer was : Oh! That takes a long time, and you have to leave it over night for it to be completely cooled down (which is true) He then said : they are usually mostly fine, so don't worry about it...
Great answer!! That's when I started to prepare to do mine

Of course your results may vary, and many people have had their results just fine. But I decided to trust my owd hands when I can do it (time and availability considering)

One true clue that absolutely gives away that they didn't check it, is if you brought it hot in the morning, and gave it back to you the same day...

Keep on ridin'
 

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How did you guys determine the correct timing chain tension? The service manual only states: "Unlock the timing chain tensioner screw counterclockwise" (how far??) and "Check the timing chain tension" (to what specs??)
 
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