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With the second Gen bikes being heavier.
Naturally, the looks are a matter of taste and I prefer the first-Gen looks.

If I wanted 15+ more horsepower in a Duke I would have purchased A 690,790, or a 1290 Duke instead of the 390 that I desired. I did not modify the engine/drivetrain Of my 390 because I know that 3 more horsepower over stock means absolutely nothing on the street.
Also, as far as I can tell, the Duke 390 has been rated at 43hp for its entire production run, since inception
 

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If you have ever ridden on a closed circuit course where you can ride a bike to its potential you would see and feel the benefits of all the upgrades. i am NOT talking about horsepower. Horsepower does not necessarily make a bike in any means faster on the track. Slipper clutches, throttle control and response do. Speaking first hand.
 

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So you have ridden a first series and a second series on the same track with no power modifications and came home faster on the second series over the first?

If you have ever ridden on a closed circuit course where you can ride a bike to its potential you would see and feel the benefits of all the upgrades. i am NOT talking about horsepower. Horsepower does not necessarily make a bike in any means faster on the track. Slipper clutches, throttle control and response do. Speaking first hand.
 

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Another thing to consider is resale. If this is your first bike you may grow into it quickly and decide 6 months from now, you want to upgrade to a 790 or something else. The majority of prospective buyers will turn their noses up at a newer bike that has had the modern OE components and ECU segmented in lieu of previous generation mechanical components. As others have stated, purchasing a pre 2017 model and making aesthetic upgrades seems like a much more economically feasible route, with much less headache. Just my 2 cents- food for thought.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Can you link any data supporting this?
No, I can't link any data supporting this, only personal experience and from research into the actual function of a slipper clutch. A slipper clutch will wear out faster do to the fact that the clutch, when performing its job, will slip and therefore will wear out the clutches faster. As shown on this and many other articles: "The slipper clutch is designed to partially disengage or ‘slip’ when the rear wheel tries to drive the engine faster than it would under deceleration. In very simple terms, a slipper clutch disengages or ‘slips’ until the engine and wheel speeds are compatible. " How does a slipper clutch work? How it can make you faster and safer on a bike
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Another thing to consider is resale. If this is your first bike you may grow into it quickly and decide 6 months from now, you want to upgrade to a 790 or something else. The majority of prospective buyers will turn their noses up at a newer bike that has had the modern OE components and ECU segmented in lieu of previous generation mechanical components. As others have stated, purchasing a pre 2017 model and making aesthetic upgrades seems like a much more economically feasible route, with much less headache. Just my 2 cents- food for thought.
I am going to end up going this way. Just much easier to accomplish what I want on an older one.
 

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So you have ridden a first series and a second series on the same track with no power modifications and came home faster on the second series over the first?
Yes, I have ridden both. Same track. Both freshly broken in no mod,s. and yes faster on the newer version. Power delivery I felt is smoother and more responsive. The slipper clutch with clutchless downshifts is the real deal especially if you use supermoto mode and drift the bike into tight turns.
 

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Interesting as most comparisons available on the www claim otherwise.
You are aware though that the first series from 2015 onward also came with slippery clutches?
How many tenths of a second were you faster on the second-Gen and how many km is the track?
I am too scared to race motorcycles, did classic car racing in the HARC series throughout Europe though in a G3 class Lancia Fulvia 1.6HF and an Aurelia B24 in my younger years.


Yes, I have ridden both. Same track. Both freshly broken in no mod,s. and yes faster on the newer version. Power delivery I felt is smoother and more responsive. The slipper clutch with clutchless downshifts is the real deal especially if you use supermoto mode and drift the bike into tight turns.
 

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No, I can't link any data supporting this, only personal experience and from research into the actual function of a slipper clutch. A slipper clutch will wear out faster do to the fact that the clutch, when performing its job, will slip and therefore will wear out the clutches faster. As shown on this and many other articles: "The slipper clutch is designed to partially disengage or ‘slip’ when the rear wheel tries to drive the engine faster than it would under deceleration. In very simple terms, a slipper clutch disengages or ‘slips’ until the engine and wheel speeds are compatible. " How does a slipper clutch work? How it can make you faster and safer on a bike
The slipper clutch only slips when there is back torque from the wheel, i.e. during engine braking.

On the contrary, it "tightens up" during accelerations, thus eliminating slip. So if you accelerate and engine brake about the same, a slipper clutch wear can't possibly be any more than a regular clutch. If you engine brake less than you accelerate, then it's quite possible a slipper clutch will wear less than a regular clutch. For example, some riders barely engine brake and exlclusively use mechanical brakes to slow down.
 

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Interesting as most comparisons available on the www claim otherwise.
You are aware though that the first series from 2015 onward also came with slippery clutches?
How many tenths of a second were you faster on the second-Gen and how many km is the track?
I am too scared to race motorcycles, did classic car racing in the HARC series throughout Europe though in a G3 class Lancia Fulvia 1.6HF and an Aurelia B24 in my younger years.
The bottom line is this. The new gen, bikes are better in my opinion. You have to consider the bike as a whole. Individual pieces make up that whole. The slipper clutch has a better feel on the new gen bikes and takes the down shifts smoother in conjunction with the ride by wire throttle as the sensors for this work together to give you the best throttle response, acceleration, and traction. Both bikes are good. I like the new gen. better. I can ride lap after lap with a better feel on the bike which makes me faster. It may not be so for someone else but it works for ME!
 

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The slipper clutch only slips when there is back torque from the wheel, i.e. during engine braking.
As far as I understand, even then it only slips when the back torque is strong enough, not all the time.

The clutch does not slip after letting go of the throttle or properly downshifting one gear.

In normal operation, engine breaking works normally, there's no slip from the clutch, the rear wheel slows down by using the engine as a pump. If you downshift so aggressively that engine breaking becomes strong enough to lock (or almost lock) the wheel, that's where the clutch starts to slip so that the wheel continues rotating. Indeed, during this time it wears down. If you run into this scenario often enough to consider clutch wear, consider how much gearbox and drivetrain wear you'd see without the slip...
 

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Yes, I have ridden both. Same track. Both freshly broken in no mod,s. and yes faster on the newer version. Power delivery I felt is smoother and more responsive. The slipper clutch with clutchless downshifts is the real deal especially if you use supermoto mode and drift the bike into tight turns.
There are differences between 2nd and 1st gen that influence track riding more than the engine control method IMHO. The new one is taller, more legroom, different reach to handlebars, has a bit higher ground clearance, different suspension setup, more aggressive rake (like the RC390) etc. The engine is smoother, which helps in mid-corner control, but it's far from the only thing that could make the new duke faster in real life for you or me.
 
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