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Discussion Starter #1
Hello again!

OK, so I worked up my courage to ask to you guys ;-)

But seriously, having not much motorcycle experience, I have absolutely no clue what to look for in spring adjustment. I haven't even touched it yet. I ride mainly solo, but do have a pilion ride from time to time.

Is it possible at all for you to communicate "feeling" through a response on a forum? I sure would hope so!

Thanks!
 

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It's quite a personal choice to be honest. Going to depend on how heavy you are, your riding style and what your road surfaces are like.
Are you running the Pirellis?
I am 185lbs, the roads around me are a mix of decent country black top lanes and rough concrete city streets. I started on #3 setting and it is fairly decent, with little to no rebound on the smooth stuff. I'm going to go up a couple of clicks and try that.
Do not set it for when you are carrying a passenger, as your riding style will change drastically then. Just crank it up a bit when you do. Doesn't take two minutes then put it back once you are done.
Experiment, whats the worse that can happen !
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks!

And yeah I forgot to mention, I'm 140 lbs, almost never go on the highway. Back country roads, a mix of 70% asphalt and 30% gravel/dirt. Runing the Pirellis
 

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Does anyone have a workable technique for adjusting the rear spring preload without taking the shock off the bike? The manual shows a disembodied hand adjusting the spring with a c-spanner through the bars of the trellis frame. I have tried, but never succeeded at this - it's a devilish task. I would like to be able to make adjustments, but a questionable design makes this quasi-impossible. Help!
 

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Does anyone have a workable technique for adjusting the rear spring preload without taking the shock off the bike? The manual shows a disembodied hand adjusting the spring with a c-spanner through the bars of the trellis frame. I have tried, but never succeeded at this - it's a devilish task. I would like to be able to make adjustments, but a questionable design makes this quasi-impossible. Help!
Tbh mate, no.

I got Smixys bike 1 click harder by luck when in with. Sadly the frame gets in the way for more.

But its a 15 min job getting shock out, we used 2 ratchet straps on grabrails to get it an inch off the floor., couple of mins later, all done. You need to push the hugger down a touch.

Screwdriver through eyelet and in vice or strong mate to hold and get C spanner on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Doh.... :-( I was sure there was a way to do it on the fly without removing...
 

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Tbh mate, no.

I got Smixys bike 1 click harder by luck when in with. Sadly the frame gets in the way for more.

But its a 15 min job getting shock out, we used 2 ratchet straps on grabrails to get it an inch off the floor., couple of mins later, all done. You need to push the hugger down a touch.

Screwdriver through eyelet and in vice or strong mate to hold and get C spanner on it.
OK, truly inconvenient ( I have avoided harsher words here), to have to remove the shock to make an adjustment. Especially when you are trying to find the right setting of preload for your riding style and weight. And then have to change for a pillion?
Would it be possible to customize a spanner that would work with the shock in place?
 

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OK, truly inconvenient ( I have avoided harsher words here), to have to remove the shock to make an adjustment. Especially when you are trying to find the right setting of preload for your riding style and weight. And then have to change for a pillion?
Would it be possible to customize a spanner that would work with the shock in place?
Possibly, but leverage is an issue as when compressed its fairly stiff to move.
 

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Going to go home and try this for myself. My 8 is a bit of a bitch, but the is a way.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Maybe chop it of and weld in a small piece that has a 1/2 square hole in it, so that it looks something like a Crow's foot wrench? That way you can use a ratchet as a lever...
 

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Thanks!

And yeah I forgot to mention, I'm 140 lbs, almost never go on the highway. Back country roads, a mix of 70% asphalt and 30% gravel/dirt. Runing the Pirellis
Let's talk about "suspension sag" Luc, which is the difference in height of the bike, loaded versus unloaded. On our 390s, 2" is about right. Have a friend measure the distance from the ground to the passenger hand rail with you astride the bike and your weight off the saddle. Use a couple of 2×4s to stand on if you have to . Now put your full weight on the saddle and measure again. Adjust the collar on the shock until the 2" is achieved. This allows the shock to do its job by functioning in the middle of its stroke, not at the top. Remember, when riding "two up", the sag is going to increase proportionally, so you're going to have to reach a compromise on the setting, based on now often you carry a passenger. As stated by others, that adjusting collar is a real PITA. In my case at 137 lbs, the #2 notch, with #10 being the stiffest, is right for my riding style. JP
 

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Remove the rear shock to set??? Really????

I managed to very successfully set the preload using an ordinary c spanner quite a few times. (experimented with diff settings during a track day).
 

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So it is possible for a human to adjust the collar with a c-spanner, as the manual shows? I thought probably it was a robotic hand in the manual photo..
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Let's talk about "suspension sag" Luc, which is the difference in height of the bike, loaded versus unloaded. On our 390s, 2" is about right. Have a friend measure the distance from the ground to the passenger hand rail with you astride the bike and your weight off the saddle. Use a couple of 2×4s to stand on if you have to . Now put your full weight on the saddle and measure again. Adjust the collar on the shock until the 2" is achieved. This allows the shock to do its job by functioning in the middle of its stroke, not at the top. Remember, when riding "two up", the sag is going to increase proportionally, so you're going to have to reach a compromise on the setting, based on now often you carry a passenger. As stated by others, that adjusting collar is a real PITA. In my case at 137 lbs, the #2 notch, with #10 being the stiffest, is right for my riding style. JP
Ah!! Thanks! This is a great starting point! And glad to have a fellow "lightweight" rider like myself! (i get down to 137lbs when I slow down on the wine and beer ;-) )
 

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Nope, I tried.
The frame does indeed get it the way, no matter which side you try. Going to bend the handle up enough to clear.
 

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yeah, i have no issues either, stand on the right side of the bike, grab the coil wrench and the handle extension out of the tool pouch and just turn it from behind the frame
 
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yeah, i have no issues either, stand on the right side of the bike, grab the coil wrench and the handle extension out of the tool pouch and just turn it from behind the frame
Hmm, behind? I tried every way I could think of. Kind of like a chinese puzzle. Can you post a pic?
 
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