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I have a half dozen of these in my toolbox. Too bad you don't live closer, I'd send you one. I'm sure you can find an aftermarket item for less than $40 on fleabay. The inner radius should be the same as the outer radius of the adjuster ring.

My favorite has a hinged "claw," fits different adjusters. And one has a wee running rabbit logo...must be from a Rabbit scooter, circa late 1960's. Guess who made those? And no fair using google or wiki. Give up?


....wait for it....how about Fuji Heavy Industries? Come to think of it, I blew off a WRX STI today on our 390....what a wanker.
 

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HA...I figured it out
You have to get to it from the right side of the bike. Go in just in front of the rear frame spar.
I though I took some pics but I don't find them now. I'll take some when I get home and get them posted for you guys. One click at a time, but it is possible.
 

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Hoover - good one mate! Please post a how-to with pics and details of the tool and technique to use. Many of us would be happy to see your solution!
 

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As promised, here you go. I spoke in error first. It is behind the rear frame spar. It is a 2 handed job. Use your left hand to hold the wrench on the ring as you turn it. BE CAREFUL. It will hurt if it slips. (Wear mechanix gloves).
You can only do one click at a time. First pics are going up, next one is coming back down.

Tools from tool roll:



Angle of attack



On the adjuster





Going back down, flip it around.



Right ho, that's 2 major issues sorted, on to the stupid gas cap next. I want a locking one, going to look at the RC one.
 

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My tool that is OEM KTM doesn't have a handle to place on the end. Plus, there's not enough room to get the wrench in to turn it. Help please!
 

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Even if you can master the tricky technique for adjusting the preload on the OEM shock, you are still working with something that, IMO, is probably the most underperforming component on the bike. This crude, low-budget item detracts substantially from the performance and comfort potential of the bike. In terms of upgrades, if you are interested in improving your Duke's performance, investing in a proper shock (ie. Ohlins, JRI, Penske, YSS, Nitron, M Shock, Wilbers, R6 Conversion, etc,) will yield far better results than fitting an aftermarket exhaust. Just my thought.
 
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Even if you can master the tricky technique for adjusting the preload on the OEM shock, you are still working with something that, IMO, is probably the most underperforming component on the bike. This crude, low-budget item detracts substantially from the performance and comfort potential of the bike. In terms of upgrades, if you are interested in improving your Duke's performance, investing in a proper shock (ie. Ohlins, JRI, Penske, YSS, Nitron, M Shock, Wilbers, R6 Conversion, etc,) will yield far better results than fitting an aftermarket exhaust. Just my thought.
This doesn't help me (right now) to try to adjust my rear spring a few notches. :D
 

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True, but going through the contortions to adjust the OEM shock will make you appreciate it more when you eventually fit a proper shock.
 

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yeah, i have no issues either, stand on the right side of the bike, grab the coil wrench and the handle extension out of the tool pouch and just turn it from behind the frame
This is exactly how I went up a notch from stock 3 to 4. Took 5 seconds once the wrench was on the shock.
 

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So pleased I found this thread. I'm on stock setting but this weekend two up with Givi box heading to the mountains.

I need more preload. Do I turn clockwise or anticlockwise as I look at the shock from the right hand side?

Is the bike meant to get higher or lower with more preload?
 

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Does anyone have a workable technique for adjusting the rear spring preload without taking the shock off the bike? The manual shows a disembodied hand adjusting the spring with a c-spanner through the bars of the trellis frame. I have tried, but never succeeded at this - it's a devilish task. I would like to be able to make adjustments, but a questionable design makes this quasi-impossible. Help!
I was able to adjust preload on the stock shock using the tool that came with the bike pretty easily. I think that I had to go at it from different sides depending on what setting the shock collar was on and flipping the tool over helped when it didn't quite line up.
 

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I was able to adjust preload on the stock shock using the tool that came with the bike pretty easily. I think that I had to go at it from different sides depending on what setting the shock collar was on and flipping the tool over helped when it didn't quite line up.


I cheated and had the mechanic at the dealership set my preload before I rode off for the first time :D
 
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I need more preload. Do I turn clockwise or anticlockwise as I look at the shock from the right hand side?

Is the bike meant to get higher or lower with more preload?
 

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You turn it clockwise. The adjuster needs to walk up the notch, compressing the spring. Ride height will not change. It will just decrease spring re bound by effectively making it stiffer.
It's a pretty crap rear assembly, so you will not notice much change. The damping is not very good and not adjustable.
If you are concerned, crank it all the way up, and then back it down accordingly.
 

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That doesn't help me one bit! Firstly "righty tighty" written down makes you look seriously childish, and secondly it doesn't answer the question. Thanks though.
No need for twisted knickers, Mate! Brammers was just trying to be helpful by giving you a handy mnemonic: ie, a device such as a rhyme or acronym for assisting memory. "Righty tighty, lefty loosey" helps to remember that turning a screw to the right (ie clockwise) tightens, to the left (counter-clockwise) loosens. Similarly, "Spring forward, fall back" is a mnemonic that helps to remember which direction to turn the clock when changing between North American Standard Time and Daylight Savings Time in the spring and fall.
 
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