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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read many posts that reference the RBE piggyback installation with sentences like "pull the fuel tank, then connect the piggyback". I needed a higher level of granularity, so here is a step by step installation process for RBE piggyback from my experience. Hopefully, it will help others alleviate any worries and help them feel more prepared or actually prepare better.

First, the tools you will need:
- Flathead screwdriver.
- Allen wrench set - preferably a socket type, to torque the allen screws during reassembly.
- Socket set - 8, 10, 12, 14, 17mm.
- A few blue shop paper towels (to soak up the spilled gasoline).
- Electrical tape.
- Scissors (to cut the tape).
- A few zipties to replace the ones you will cut.

Second, it took me about 4 hours including a few breaks and a thorough clean-up. I'm sure it can be done in half the time, but I tried to get everything perfect and rerouted a few wires several times.

Third, the fuel tank removal is very straightforward, and only about an ounce of gas spills when you disconnect the lines. There are two quick connect fuel lines coming from the pump, one electrical socket, and a drain tube to disconnect.

Here are the steps:

First, remove the passenger and front seats (no tools required yet).

Next, remove the fuel tank left and right trims (5 screws per side, with the longer one going into the topmost hole). (use one of the allen wrenches).

Then, unbolt the catchcan bracket and the coolant overflow tank bracket. (10mm socket).

Then, unbolt the trim guide bolts (14mm socket, I think).

Then, unbolt the rear fuel tank bolt (12mm socket), then pop the ignition lock cover (just pull straight up on it; it's mounted on iron barbs using rubber gaskets), and underneath it there are two more 12mm bolts.

Then, unbolt the two remaining allen screws surrounding the ignition lock.

Now, you can lift up the tank. Put one or two large absorbent paper towels under the quick connect sockets, and disconnect the quick connect fuel lines, then the electrical socket.

Lastly, disconnect the drain tube. You can use your fingers for the clip - I did - or use pliers.

Now, you can carefully lift the gas tank all the way up and set it aside. Be careful to set it down on a clean, dust-free surface. Although the gas going through these fuel lines will still go through the filter, you don't want any exogenous dirt in the system if you can avoid it.

After you clean up the spilled gasoline, you're ready to start connecting your RBE harness.

Follow the printed instructions, but I'll provide a few tips that would've helped me locate the connectors faster.

The fuel injector connector is right on top of the intake manifold, on the rear of the engine head.

The oxygen sensor connector is on the front left, almost right behind the ignition coil. It will help if you remove the ignition coil cover and the coil itself. The Crankshaft Position Sensor is right next to the O2 sensor, also behind the ignition coil.

The 6 pin connector with the Throttle Position Sensor wire is on the right side of the frame, on the inside of the rear end of the main frame. The best way to tap the wire, in my opinion, is higher and farther away from the connector, so the connection is subject to less stresses as you route and reroute your wires. To do this, I cut the wire loom isolation where I wanted, while being careful not to cut any of the actual wires. Then I tapped in, and wrapped the whole thing with electrical tape to make sure the connection is safe from splashing water.

The feeding voltage connector was hidden next to the 6-pin connector for TPS, and ziptied such that it took me 20 minutes to find it.

Lastly, I personally routed the main wire loom on the right side of the seat, right under it. I tucked all the extra connectors (CAN-BUS, USB, etc.) into the void on the right side of the battery. In the future, I think it will be beneficial to buy A smaller Li-Ion battery and mount the RBE itself next to the battery. As is, the front seat is putting a decent amount of pressure on the the main wire loom, but not pinching it completely. I am planning to reinspect how the harness is holding up in a few hundred miles.

After everything is connected and the TPS tap is taped, put everything back together in the reverse order. Keep in mind that the longer allen bolts are for the top sides of the gas tank trims.

When installing the front seat, be careful not to pinch the harness.
 

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Fantastic guide thanks. It's on my list of jobs for the winter to do this.

Also with the wire pinching by the seat. It's relatively easy to remove the bar that the front seat goes into. You can then remove the fusebox and plastic bits. Underneath there is small amounts of space to run cable through. Probably safer for your needs.

Lithium battery is very recommended though as it saves a ton of weight and space. I've got a bracket ready designed and printed to allow the rapidbike to fit in with mine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Fantastic guide thanks. It's on my list of jobs for the winter to do this.

Also with the wire pinching by the seat. It's relatively easy to remove the bar that the front seat goes into. You can then remove the fusebox and plastic bits. Underneath there is small amounts of space to run cable through. Probably safer for your needs.

Lithium battery is very recommended though as it saves a ton of weight and space. I've got a bracket ready designed and printed to allow the rapidbike to fit in with mine.
I was actually going to ask you to share the bracket once you're finished, and if you are ok with that. I want to buy a lithium ion battery and put the RBE next to the battery.
 

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I was actually going to ask you to share the bracket once you're finished, and if you are ok with that. I want to buy a lithium ion battery and put the RBE next to the battery.
I would be ok with it, the problem is that the battery mount only works for the specific battery I used. And it's not the best choice for our bikes. The poles are swapped round and so I had to change the wiring routes.

Also it requires sewing a strap and velcro into place so requires added work. (My wife rocks and did it for me).

So I'm not sure it will work for anyone to release it. I wanted at a bracket for both that was more universal, but there just aren't many mounting points. As it was I had to drill a small hole in the plastics to make a 3rd hole in the right place.

I think it could be possible to design something that uses the same mounts for some batteries, but it will be a fair bit of work and trial and error.
 
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