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hi all ,I just brought a duke my first bike.. so pumped its unreal. I have so many questions but.
my first one is should I change the oil and filter at 100km?
and I read in manual when running in you shouldn't go over 7500rpm, which ive stuck too but I read somewhere that you shouldn't stay a one speed for to long and don't use top gear. can anyone tell if that's true.
cheers
 

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The recommended 1st oil change is around 1000km. If you want to waste money before then, that's your decision.

Yes - vary the speed when running in. You can use top gear but avoid 'lugging' (loading up at low RPMS).

The 390 engine is a well designed, high tolerance engine - I don't see a lot of drama regardless how the run in is done once you're past the first 100km of so.
 

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Congrats on the purchase MM. Surf the net and you will find "lots" of opinions of how to run it in. Best advice is do what you feel comfortable with, Im in the camp of heavy break in while others are gentle and to the book.
For oil again its users choice but I would suggest 100k is pretty early for its change, I didnt change mine for the first 1000 and although there was some crap it was normal to my eye. If you do replace it dont use synthetic yet as the oil inside is Mineral Oil and I wouldnt be in a hurry to change it over until the 1000k mark.
 

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welcome aboard me-mat, I would say the most important thing when running in is variance. Don't be afraid of the high revs, in fact a couple quick spurts at the top end is actually quite good for getting everything to settle into its correct place and creating a good seal between the rings and cylinder walls!

Congrats on the new bike!
 

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Congrats on the purchase MM. Surf the net and you will find "lots" of opinions of how to run it in. Best advice is do what you feel comfortable with, Im in the camp of heavy break in while others are gentle and to the book.
For oil again its users choice but I would suggest 100k is pretty early for its change, I didnt change mine for the first 1000 and although there was some crap it was normal to my eye. If you do replace it dont use synthetic yet as the oil inside is Mineral Oil and I wouldnt be in a hurry to change it over until the 1000k mark.
Im in the same boat as you on the break in, I didnt ride it like a baby but I also didnt hammer it.
 

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you can rev it up

just dont keep it there


i personally try not to do it too often

but its not a bad idea to rev it up

i like to rev it up high and then let the revs drop down and cruise along.
 

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STOP AND READ THIS 1st !

RIDE AS IF YOU HAVE STOLE IT !!!!

that's THE proper way to break-in or run-in your new motor ... and after you have TRASHED the bike ... say 750km or 1000km ... replenish with a proper 10-60W Fully Synthetic Motorex to seal all the unevenness ....

Remember ... the only way for your motor to runs smooth is after the break-in as you have finally moved all the moveable parts accordingly and no matter how accurate the engine mechanism should be factory-polished ... nothing polish the engine better then breaking in period ... and breaking in oils is cheap mineral oil where it will make sure everything got grinded evenly before the new fresh synthetic oil came in an pamper it hehehe ...

i have reminded you and WELCOME !!!! hehehe ...

~the notorious hooligan phil ~
 

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i wouldnt say its just ride it like you stole it

varying the rpms is important

i wouldnt just run it at redline down the street for 10 minutes

i dont think that would be breaking it in properly

you can go fast. you can rev high

but you need to vary the rev band so the pressures on the piston rings and seals are positive and negative.
 

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i would ride it like I stole it for random moments, but short ones, and after the break in process i'd ride it like I stole it far more often. I believe in a mix of soft and hard riding for breaking it in, maybe 70/30? 70 being soft
 

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no phils got it pretty bang on for break in techniques...

Break In Secrets--How To Break In New Motorcycle and Car Engines For More Power

What's The Best Way To Break-In A New Engine ??
The Short Answer: Run it Hard !

Why ??
Nowadays, the piston ring seal is really what the break in process is all about. Contrary to popular belief, piston rings don't seal the combustion pressure by spring tension. Ring tension is necessary only to "scrape" the oil to prevent it from entering the combustion chamber.

If you think about it, the ring exerts maybe 5-10 lbs of spring tension against the cylinder wall ...
How can such a small amount of spring tension seal against thousands of
PSI (Pounds Per Square Inch) of combustion pressure ??
Of course it can't.

How Do Rings Seal Against Tremendous Combustion Pressure ??

From the actual gas pressure itself !! It passes over the top of the ring, and gets behind it to force it outward against the cylinder wall. The problem is that new rings are far from perfect and they must be worn in quite a bit in order to completely seal all the way around the bore. If the gas pressure is strong enough during the engine's first miles of operation (open that throttle !!!), then the entire ring will wear into
the cylinder surface, to seal the combustion pressure as well as possible.


The Problem With "Easy Break In" ...
The honed crosshatch pattern in the cylinder bore acts like a file to allow the rings to wear. The rings quickly wear down the "peaks" of this roughness, regardless of how hard the engine is run.

There's a very small window of opportunity to get the rings to seal really well ... the first 20 miles !!

If the rings aren't forced against the walls soon enough, they'll use up the roughness before they fully seat. Once that happens there is no solution but to re hone the cylinders, install new rings and start over again.

Fortunately, most new sportbike owners can't resist the urge to "open it up" once or twice,
which is why more engines don't have this problem !!

An additional factor that you may not have realized, is that the person at the dealership who set up your bike probably blasted your brand new bike pretty hard on the "test run". So, without realizing it, that adrenaline crazed set - up mechanic actually did you a huge favor !!
 
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