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I noticed my front tire is due for replacement but my rear one seems like it still has some life left, shouldn't the rear tire be wearing out faster? That was always the case on my bicycles.

I suspect it's because for the first 10,000 kms I wasn't using engine braking much and used mostly the front brake, but eventually I instinctively started using engine braking all the time.

I saw the KTM website doesn't seem to sell tires so where can I get new tires? I assume changing them isn't something you can do without expensive equipment?

Thanks
 

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Ok... thots...

Yeah, i 4 1 wear out my rear tires in 4,000 miles, gone.
My fronts, by contrast, last 8 - 10 kmiles, stretching it actually after 8.

Do you need expensive equip(?), no.

Take the tire/wheel off your bike.
Remove the shrader valve and let all the air out.
Take a sharp utility knife, tungsten is even better somehow, and cut the main tread off by severing both sidewalls all the way around.
Next, take a dremel tool with a disk blade and sever the steel bead wire on both shoulders, don't nik the rim surface. You'll know you cut the steel bead thru when you hear it pop, then lift it away from the rim a little bit and finish severring it with the utility knife.
Throw all 3 pieces of the used tire away.

Now lay the new tire down on the ground, on a padded blanket of some sort, and put eight 16 inch heavy duty zip tie straps around the tire at 45 degree intervals.
One at a time, tighten them while forcing the bead sections tightly together with your knee(s).
Take careful note where the balance dot is on the new tire, and on your bikes rim.
Make sure you have the tire orientation correct, there is a rotation direction marker on the sidewall.
Lube the tire beads generously, and place the aforementioned dots in sync to each other (even if they are on the opposite sides of the rim).
Lay the rim down on the aforementioned padded blanket.
Starting with the position of the dots, force the tire onto the rim, going back and forth left to right, both beads at the same time, yes, until suddenly the tire just falls onto the rim. Yell hoorah!
Readjust the position of the dots again, before you cut the zip ties.

Cut off (or release the locks of) the zip ties and remove them.
Relube the beads once, thoroughly, and inflate immediately to 42 psi; the beads should pop/snap into place neatly.
Put the shrader valve back in and adjust inflation pressure.

You're in Canada... so... Fortnine.ca(?)

[man, thats a lotta werds... but i mean well]

[did i miss anything?]

oh yeah!
you're probably wondering why i didn't say anything about balance.
point taken, most of the time, the only true balance problem exists with the rim, not with the new tire.
so if the rim still has its original weights intact, and you have properly identified the position of the old dots, mounting a new tire in the same location results in a highly precise repeat balance arrangement.
I have a tendency to continue reproving this to myself, so im just passing it along, hoping for the best for you also, so there ya go.
 

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Here is US I use Rocky mountain for my tires. Tires | Rocky Mountain ATV/MC
In my case I ordered the tires and installed them by scooping the tire off (which was rather easy to do) and do it all in reverse. Rocky mountain sells the tools to do it that way- Rocky Mountain ATV/MC - Search Results for tire irons
if you follow Duke of seven, or most step by step videos on YouTube you'll be able to do zip ties and inexpensive tool combo rather easily yourself. My front tires where really hard to get on and I didnt want to scratch rim so I had it installed at local bike shop for $50.
 

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Definitely don't remove the old tire the way that duke of seven listed. Instead take it off normally, or using zip ties (the reverse of installation), or just take the wheels to a tire shop and they'll get rid of the tires for you responsibly.

Further, many motorcycle tire shops will install tires for free (and remove the old ones and dispose of them) if you buy the tires from them.
 

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My front tires where really hard to get on and I didnt want to scratch rim
Yeah, the steering tires are always built that way, stiff as heck with very short sidewalls,

and you're probably gonna scratch it up no matter what tools you try to use manually.

I've got the motion pro bead separator spoons that interlock...
and the plastic reinforced Stubby Slim tools...
and the 2-foot long steel spoons...
and the motion pro bead protector inserts...
and the short steel gold spoons with the pretty red handles...

and push come to shove, I just got over myself, slapped myself, stepped up and cut them away.

See, the first time around, maybe somebody doesn't already know these are safety rims, just like a Vette or Prelude.
They have a raised step, just inside of where the tire bead sits, and once the tire starts adhering to the outer circumference of the rim, it's damnear impossible to dislodge from that bond, then over that rise, even with the (cool tools) everybody says are moxie-happenin'.

In fact, the bead on the front is so spectacularly tight, horizontally -- even if you bust the bead with the tire machine at work -- that you can't even get the zip ties in between the tire and rim to use them in aiding disassembly; never mind how are you gonna push the beads together, to cinch the straps, with the tire still mounted.

hmmm...
I'll bet that's why I cut them off real quick like.

Then, of course I carry them over to the kitchen sink, as Varroa suggested, and I begin the long arduous task of forcing them down the garbage disposal, insistent that famed electrical alliance (break down and devour) every last tasty morsel of carbon-black and silica goodness!! Moo-ha-ha!!

No.

Actually...

I put them on the tire recycling stack at work, where I changed the tires in the first place.

So can we come back to earth now?
 

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My method has always been to order the tires online (Revzilla, etc), pull my wheels, and drop everything off at the local MC shop to have the tires installed. Cheaper than dropping off the whole bike, not a day long knuckle buster like swapping tires yourself, and also gives you a chance to check chain slack/condition, wheel bearings, brakes, etc.
 

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My method has always been to order the tires online (Revzilla, etc), pull my wheels, and drop everything off at the local MC shop to have the tires installed. Cheaper than dropping off the whole bike, not a day long knuckle buster like swapping tires yourself, and also gives you a chance to check chain slack/condition, wheel bearings, brakes, etc.
Most , if not all, the shops here required me to bring the wheel/tires off the bike. they didnt care if I bought the tires from them or not, same install price, one was willing to take $25 off the tire install but wanted over $75 more than mail order for the same tire.
Honestly, if one is motivated and willing to do it themselves, do yourself a favor DONT watch youtube videos of 5 minutes to remove and reinstall tires. it is MUCH longer and harder than they make it seem, even the zip ties method, which I tried, although easier, was still a bear to get the last 1/4 completed. I dont have the arsenal of tools the dukeofseven has, but even with that arsenal it is still a good 30minutes to 1 hour to do it manually.(motorcyclist, How To Change & Balance Your Own Motorcycle Tires | MC GARAGE on youtube has one of those tools and shows how he uses it to replace REAR tire. Im guessing the tire was warm and well stretched for his demo- he makes it look way too easy at the end.) For me the rear was easily done, the front, based on experience isnt worth my time in money. So as they say "time is money" and I rather give the money for someone elses time and hydraulic tools and dynamic balancing than Im motivated. So back to the question on front tire/tyre. I would follow OpenGLs advice, take the front off and mail order the tire, or find a local shop to give you a quote on buying tire from them and installing it, regardless of where you get the tire, have a shop remove/ reinstall the tire for you. When you get to the back tire , consider doing that yourself.
 
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